The God Shed

Posted by Jaxon Prendergast in Industrial Services | Comments Off on The God Shed

Shed was a god of Ancient Egypt, son of the great goddess Isis. No temples were erected in his honor, there was no official cult. He was a god of the ordinary people, protecting them from illness, misfortune and danger. Shed the Savior, Shed the Enchanter, Lord of the Desert, is depicted as a boy, sometimes a young man, grasping snakes and scorpions and battling lions while standing on the backs of crocodiles. Surely it is not just a coincidence that we use the same name for the shelters we build to protect our goods with farm sheds, our animals and our possessions.

If we need a guardian to protect our sheds, it would be hard to find one more appropriate than this god. Wild animals not infrequently take up residence in or under a shed to the considerable inconvenience of the owners. If the god Shed could drive off wild lions, he can surely protect against a few possums, foxes and bats. Spiders are common inhabitants of all sheds; wasps build nests in them; termites destroy others; so a guardian with experience in scorpion control could be useful indeed. And his reputation suggests that the god Shed would be particularly effective in protecting against the snakes and even the occasional alligator that find their way into sheds from time to time.

It is not just our garden sheds that need a guardian; industrial sheds are even more in need of a protector. These are often in non residential areas which are mostly deserted at night and vulnerable to thieves and vandals. If an extra level of security is needed, it should be noted that the ancient Egyptians looked to the god Shed for protection against invaders and marauders. Workplace Health and Safety regulations are extensive, but only go so far. They have as yet failed to even consider the importance of steel pergola designs an appropriate guardian. Sheds need a down to earth guardian like the god Shed, one who identifies with the workers, a guardian who will not only protect them against danger, but also against ill health and disease and help restore to health those who do become ill.

Sometimes in sheds, as in life generally, things happen that we cannot foresee; events that are beyond our control. It is a comforting thought that there may be some way we can protect ourselves generally against any misfortune that might arise. For some this means knocking on wood, for others it involves throwing salt over the shoulder. But if your shed is made of steel, or you are on a low salt diet, a guardian from Ancient Egypt could be the answer: a protector who has centuries of experience protecting ordinary people from both specific and general misfortunes: one whose name is surely an indication that the god Shed is ready to resume his role in the humblest garden shed or the largest industrial one.

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